• Graduation Requirements

    Students seeking a Standard diploma must complete a minimum of three social science classes, with one being a verified credit (passing the linked SOL test). Students seeking Advanced Studies diplomas must complete a minimum of four social science classes, with two being a verified credit (passing the linked SOL test). All students must also complete one credit of Economics & Personal Finance.

    Social Science and Global Studies Core Course

    World History/Geography to 1500
    Academic - 740300
    Grade(s): 9 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    In this course, students learn to think critically about world events and societies around the globe before they year 1500. They learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal.
    This is a course in the human history of the world that asks the following questions: What changes and events have caused people to live the way they do today? What progress have humans made? What problems have humans faced? What problems still exist today?

     

    Introduction to AP World History/ Geography to 1500 - 740900
    Grade(s): Sequenced for Grade 9 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    Starting with the human communities of early world history, this course teaches students to think critically about large global patterns and themes and to compare human characteristics across time and geographic locations. Students learn about people in different places and environments from 8000 BCE to 1500 CE and gain understanding of the connections and differences between human beings as they study historical trends and events.
    Since writing is a thinking process, all forms of writing, both formal and informal, are emphasized in this course. Students learn to understand and use primary sources as historical evidence to conduct research and produce essays.
    This is a course in global history and serves as the foundation course for the 10th grade AP World History class.

     

    World History/Geography 1500 to present
    Academic 745300
    Grade(s): 10 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    Today, individuals live in a global world that allows them to log on to a computer and talk live to other students in China, India, or South Africa. World History helps students understand how different societies developed the way they did and prepares students to live in a global, interconnected society.
    In World History II, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped the world. They compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and places. They learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal.
    This course assists students in the study of modern human history by posing the questions: What changes and events have caused people to live the way they do today? What progress have humans made? What problems still exist today? What solutions to these problems can individuals of today offer?

     

    AP World History 751000
    Grade(s): 10-12 (Sequenced for Grade 10) Credit: 1; Weighted 1.0
    Prerequisite: World History/Geography
    Today, individuals live in a global world that allows them to log on to a computer and talk live to other students in China, India, or South Africa. AP World History helps students understand how different societies developed the way they did and prepares students to live in a global, interconnected society.
    In AP World History, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. They compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and places.
    Students learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. They also have a chance to complete an inquiry-based project on a World History topic of personal interest.
    This course teaches students to think critically and to develop the ability to use evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions.
    Students have the opportunity to take the AP World History exam in May with the possibility of earning college credit.

     

    United States and Virginia History
    Academic 750300
    Grade(s): 11 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    In U.S./Virginia History students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. Students compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and regions. They learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal.
    In this class, students are expected to develop their ability to independently use historical evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions. This course helps students improve their ability to think critically while examining how the people of America have met needs, formed communities, and developed into new, diverse, and complex societies.

     

    United States History DE 750007
    Grade(s): 11 Credit: 1; Weighted 0.5
    Prerequisite: None; students must pass entrance/skills test
    In Dual Enrollment U.S. History, students will develop their skills and their knowledge base to function successfully in this college-level class. Requirements for Loudoun County Public Schools and Northern Virginia Community College will have to be met by each student. The course will have university-level academic expectations, but with hard work and the support of our teachers, students Loudoun County Public Schools will develop to meet the challenge and will earn college credit when they complete it.
    In this class, students will expand their ability to think analytically about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. Students will address questions such as: How did a nation whose Constitution first included the 3/5 Compromise eventually come to have an African-American President in 2009?
    Students will compare the roles of different groups of people in different times and regions. They will come to understand history as an investigation, and will develop their abilities to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal.
    In Dual Enrollment U.S. History, students are expected to develop their ability to use historical evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions, and to improve their ability to think critically about the growth and development of the United States of America.

     

    AP United States History 750100
    Grade(s): 11 Credit: 1; Weighted 1.0
    Prerequisite: None
    In AP U.S. History, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. They address questions such as: How did a nation whose Constitution first included the 3/5 Compromise eventually come to have an African-American President in 2009?
    Students compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and regions. Students continue to learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal.
    In this class, students are expected to develop their ability to use historical evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions and to improve their ability to think critically about the formation of the United States of America.
    Students have the opportunity to take the AP U.S. History exam in May with the possibility to earn college credit.

     

    United States/Virginia Government
    Academic 760300
    Grade(s): 12 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    In U.S./Virginia Government, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and political forces that shape their lives. They continue to develop their thinking in an organized way for clear communication in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. They strengthen their independent ability to describe and make conclusions about government structures and policies.
    This course helps improve students’ ability to think critically and to examine how the people of America meet their needs for constructive political life in a diverse society. Democracy depends on citizens paying attention and getting involved. The course prepares students to be thoughtful and active citizens of the United States.

     

    United States/Virginia Government DE 760006
    Grade(s): 12 Credit: 1; Weighted 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    In Dual Enrollment U.S. Government, students will develop their skills and their knowledge base to function successfully in this college level class. Requirements for Loudoun County Public Schools and Northern Virginia Community College will be met by each student. The course will have university-level academic expectations, but with hard work and the support of our teachers, students will develop to meet the challenge and will earn college credit when they complete it.
    In this course, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and political forces that shape their lives. They continue to develop their thinking in an organized way for clear communication in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. They strengthen their independent ability to describe and make conclusions about government structures and policies. They will address and become informed about multiple issues facing our government and the processes through which it works, with the aim of becoming not only novice-scholars of democracy and republican government, but active, involved, responsible citizens.
    This course helps improve students’ ability to think critically and to examine how the people of America meet their needs for constructive political life in a diverse society.

     

    Combination AP United States Government and AP Comparative Government 762000
    Grade(s): 12 Credit: 1; Weighted 1.0
    Prerequisite: None
    This course combines AP U.S. and AP Comparative Government. The College Board curricula for both courses have been woven together to make this one coherent, yearlong course. Students who seek the 1.0 weight must pass the entire year-long course. Students are encouraged to take both the AP U.S. Government and the AP Comparative Government exams in May. All students are prepared for both exams.
    In AP Government, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about the social and political forces that shape their lives. Concepts which are considered include life under a political system where people are “guilty until proven innocent” and what it would be like to have an election where each office had only one candidate; these are different interpretations of “democracy.” In this class, students study the principles of government in the U.S. and the institutions and laws used to make government work. They also compare U.S. systems and laws used to make government work. They also compare U.S. systems and laws to those of other countries so students can examine how different societies define “justice” and those societies’ notions of civil rights and civic responsibility.
    Through the examination and comparison of government systems, students develop and improve their analytical skills, and they improve their ability to think in an  Loudoun County Public Schools organized way about very complex issues that involve many different types of people, groups, and institutions. Students also improve their communication skills since government is a social topic. Students’ analytical writing and active listening skills are significantly developed as they improve their ability to participate in political debate with fairness and respect for diverse perspectives.
    Students have the opportunity to take the AP U.S. Government and Comparative Government exams in May with the possibility of earning college credit.

     

    Economics 782700
    Grade(s): 10-12 Credit: 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    In this course, students discover that basic economic principles are at work in life every day, and an understanding of these principles helps them to make better economic choices.
    Students also learn how governments and private financial institutions impact their economic choices by the decisions they make about “who gets what” in a world with scarce resources.
    Students must take a one-semester course in Economics and a one-semester course in Personal Finance in order to graduate. This course fulfills the Economics portion of the one-year requirement for graduation.

     

    AP Microeconomics/AP Macroeconomics 782000
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 1; Weighted 1.0
    Prerequisite: None
    Students wishing to fulfill the Economics and Personal Finance graduation requirement with this course must compete both AP components: Micro and Macro. The microeconomic component of this AP course provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. The primary focus of the course is to help individuals develop an understanding of markets and the role the government plays promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.
    The macroeconomic component of this course provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics as they apply to the economic system as a whole. This portion of the course focuses on national income and price-level determination and develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, economic growth and stabilization policies, and international economics.
    In this course, students are required to think critically about the complex issues surrounding a world with limited resources.
    Students have the opportunity to take the AP Micro and Macro Economics exam in May with the possibility of earning college credit.

     

    Social Science and Global Studies Electives

    Survey of African History 741210
    Survey of African History DE 741206
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    Much of African history as people hear it consists of information beginning with when Europe began to interact with the continent of Africa, omitting much of the complete story of rich traditions, major events, and diverse cultures that stretch back far in time and across a huge land mass.
    Students who want to learn about the history of this gigantic and diverse place and would like to look at history “through African eyes,” should select this course. Students should be prepared to read, discuss, and write.

     

    Survey of Latin American History 781100
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 1
    Prerequisite: None
    Latin America has more than 23 countries and even more cultural backgrounds. The largest country in Latin America does not speak Spanish but speaks Portuguese. Often, the United States’ closest geographic neighbors are lumped together as one culture and considered to have only one “history.” Complex histories, cultures, and social systems exist in this fascinating area, and they require serious study and examination to improve cultural understanding.
    Students who want to learn about the history of this gigantic and diverse place and would like to look at history through the diverse perspectives of Latin America should select this course. They should be prepared to read, discuss, write, and learn.

     

    Global Social Issues 775000
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    In Global Social Issues, students learn that people on this planet have numerous differences yet face issues and challenges which are connected. Issues that may seem to impact only one area may actually impact other people and societies across the globe.
    In this course, students study how humans behave and interact with each other. In some instances, people and nations work together on environmental concerns, and in others, people and nations work at cross-purposes on the environment. Furthermore, with issues such as women’s rights, students discover a wide spectrum of views and approaches according to a particular society’s culture and history.

     

    AP Human Geography 741100
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 1; Weighted 1.0
    Prerequisite: None
    AP Human geography helps students analyze the world and their relationship to it. Students learn to look for geographic causes for events in different regions to compare geographic features and their effects on human life, and to see how their lives are connected to and affected by human and geographic conditions all over the globe. In this course, students write, read, discuss, and present issues of global and local importance. Students also learn about an Loudoun County Public Schools important tool for Human Geography: GIS software. AP Human Geography prepares individuals to be part of the solution to the challenges facing humanity on Earth in the 21st Century.
    Students have the opportunity to take the AP Human Geography exam in May with the possibility of earning college credit.

     

    Modern International Relations 784700
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    In this course, students examine the ways in which people and nations relate to each other and develop their own ideas about how the new global situation should be addressed. Students in this course must closely read and listen to the news, too, because people are moving and taking actions all the time in today’s world, and lives are affected by people or events from beyond the national borders.
    This course assists students in learning how they can contribute to the solutions to international problems and develop their own abilities to function on the increasingly interconnected globe.

     

    Psychology 786700
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    Psychology provides students with ideas about how to address many questions regarding human behavior. Psychologists provide biological, emotional, and situational reasons as answers to questions about human behavior. By studying those reasons, students gain a better understanding of why people do what they do and develop the ability to generate their own answers.
    Psychology helps students think about human behavior in an organized way.

     

    AP Psychology 787100
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 1; Weighted 1.0
    Prerequisite: None
    Psychologists study all aspects of human behaviors: those that humans have in common with animals and those that humans do not, and those that range from peace-making to the microscopic functioning of a nerve cell. Students become psychologists in this course and expand their minds to analyze human behavior in methodical, organized, large-scale, small-scale, inquiry-based approaches. Students need to work hard to read about, understand, write about, discuss, and explain the ways humans behave.
    Class participants study how humans learn, how humans inherit traits from their parents, how humans act in groups, why humans have emotions, and how humans sometimes engage in behaviors that are destructive.
    Students have the opportunity to take the AP Psychology exam in May with the possibility of earning college credit.

     

    The World of Ideas 741300
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    This course focuses on three main philosophical  questions:

    • Is there a purpose to life?
    • What is the definition of a human being?
    • How can human beings know anything for sure?

    In this course, students explore their answers to these questions by studying the answers given to them by a diversity of cultures and traditions across the globe.
    Students who take this course will explore the world of ideas and may develop some ideas about their place in the universe or may generate many more questions they would like to explore.

     

    World Religions 741400
    Grade(s): 11-12 Credit: 0.5
    Prerequisite: None
    Teenagers of Aborigine heritage in Australia have traditionally gone through a “rite of passage” called a “Walkabout.” They are meant to have a spiritual awakening in the Outback by surviving in the desert without supplies, and without even clothing, for one to two weeks. Students’ own backgrounds may call for a “rite of passage” for them. Why do religions have rites of passages and other ceremonies? Why do they have different types of ceremonies?
    In this course, students explore questions like those above and examine and compare the practices, faiths, and literature of the major religions in the world today. They do so with readings,  videos, creative and analytical writing, and discussion. The many beautiful, meaningful, and inspirational forms of religion in the world explain much about the world views and cultures of the diversity of people living on the globe today. Students who take this course improve their understanding of the people who share this planet with them.