• Social Sciences

    Curriculum

    Course Title: Pre-AP World History/Geography (WH I)

    Prerequisite: None

    This is an advanced, accelerated course in global history, tailored to serve the foundation for the tenth grade AP World History class.

    This course offers students the exciting drama of ancient of ancient history. From the Stone Age, through the Iron and Bronze Ages, students see mankind move from nomadic wanderers to organized societies. The “river valley civilizations” are examined as the cradles of civilization.

    The course then moves on to paint the tapestry of the great early cultures. Students study Ancient Egypt, China, and Kush. They learn of Babylon and Greece. They relive the era of Rome and the beauty of the Byzantine Empire, Han China, and Gupta India. The course describes the history, culture, and beliefs of many peoples. It includes the trans-African and Islamic trading societies, the Feudal Period, and the Renaissance and Reformation. The course ends at the Great Convergence.

    Students see the great sweep of history and the ways in which one civilization builds upon previous ones. They also study the impact of geography in shaping events and cultures of humankind, and learn to organize history according to social themes and patterns.

    While this course helps ensure that all students are well versed in the Virginia Standards of Learning, the course goes beyond the norm for ninth grade. Students will be introduced to the AP World History curriculum, and will be expected to develop the AP “habits of mind;” i.e., they will be expected to write essays, research papers with an emphasis on primary source documents and specific evidence, they will be expected to discern and understand point of view and bias, and they will be expected to assess issues of change and continuity over time. Students will also be expected to complete extensive reading beyond the text and the outside classroom.

    Students will take the World History I SOL test at the end of this course.


    Course Title: World History/Geography I (WH I)

    Prerequisite: None

    This course offers students the exciting drama of ancient of ancient history. From the Stone Age, through the Iron and Bronze Ages, students see mankind move from nomadic wanderers to organized societies. The “river valley civilizations” are examined as the cradles of civilization.

    Then the course paints the tapestry of the great early cultures. Students study Ancient Egypt, China, and Kush. They learn of Babylon and Greece. They relive the era of Rome and the beauty of the Byzantine Empire. The course describes the history, culture, and beliefs of many peoples. It now includes the Feudal Period, The Renaissance, and The Reformation. The course ends with The Great Convergence.

    Students see the great sweep of history and the way in which one civilization built upon previous ones. They also must study the impact of geography in shaping the events and cultures of humankind.

    While this course helps ensure all students are well versed in the Virginia Standards of Learning, the course will go beyond the norm for ninth grade. Students will be expected to write essays and research papers. Students will be expected to learn debate techniques and to engage in various forms of discourse. Students may have numerous reading assignments.


    Course Title: Advanced Placement World History

    Prerequisite: World History/Geography I (Pre-AP or strong academic performance recommended)

    This course covers the World History curriculum as it is described in the College Board’s AP “Acorn” book. It focuses on the years 1450 CE to the present. Students review topics covered in Pre-AP World History or WH I during the first five to six weeks of the class, and then move to a thematic survey of modern world history from the Great Convergence to the temporary era.

    AP World History in grade 10 leads students to study the sweeping themes that tell the history of our world. It focuses on trends, cultures, and movements in addition to facts, events, and chronologies. The content includes imperial systems, international trade, demographics, the Ottomans, the Mughals, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, and much more.

    This is an exciting course that requires advanced work on the part of students. Extensive outside reading is required. The course is challenging and is designed for tenth grade students who would like to work at advanced levels.

    All students taking this class will take the AP World History exam, as well as the SOL Test for World History II.


    Course Title: World History/Geography II (WH II)

    Prerequisite: None

    This course is a survey of modern world history. It begins with The Great Convergence when voyages of the European explorers brought together the old and new worlds. The great revolutions spawned new democracies in the United States.

    Sadly, much of the modern era has been shaped by major strife between nations, the era of World War I and World War II as well as the War in Vietnam and “The Cold War.” Against this background, however, the great drama of the movement toward human and civil rights also unfolds.

    The lives and accomplishments of great men and women are performed on the stage of world history. Students also study the impact of geography in shaping world history and events.

    While this course helps ensure that all students are well versed in the Virginia Standards of Learning, the course goes beyond the norm for tenth grade. Students will be expected to write essays and research papers. Students will be expected to learn debate techniques and to engage in various forms of discourse. Students may have numerous reading assignments.


    Course Title: Advanced Placement United States History

    Prerequisite: World History/Geography I & World History/Geography II or World History AP

    Stressing the development of factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary to deal with issues and problems in American history, this course includes in-depth analysis of major developments and assessments of historical materials, evidence, and interpretations. All students taking the AP U.S. History will take the AP U.S. History examination as well as the end-of-course SOL test.


    Course Title: United States and Virginia History

    Prerequisite: None

    Instruction focuses on the concepts and content of U.S. History. Heavy emphasis is placed on recognition of cause and effect relationships.

    Course content centers around a general survey of United States History with emphasis on the development and expansion of our nation and its institutions. A perspective on the relationship between the past and contemporary issues is emphasized. Students examine the political, economic, social, and cultural growth of the United States as it moves towards its goal of “Liberty and Justice” for all.

    Basic principles inherent in important national documents are examined and related to everyday life. Students need sound written and oral communications skills for this course. Formal debate, reading beyond the text, and historic research are all part of the expectations for this academic course.


    Course Title: United States and Virginia Government

    Prerequisite: None

    This course examines the structure of government and the economy of the United States. The balance and separation of power within the U.S. government and the powers inherent to each branch and level are emphasized. Democratic values and responsible participation in the community are also analyzed. Basic principles inherent in the Constitution of the United States, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of Virginia, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the Virginia Statue for Religious Freedom are examined and related to everyday life. Because of the conceptual nature of government and the constant interaction of current affairs, the manner in which the course is taught may vary greatly from year to year.


    Course Title: Advanced Placement United States and Virginia Government

    Prerequisite: United States History (AP Recommended)

    This course follows the syllabus of the Advanced Placement United States Government curriculum of the College Board. Emphasis is placed on developing skills that will enable students to conceptualize and explain complex issues related to individual rights and responsibilities, political parties and party politics, the system of separation of powers, and checks and balances. Instruction emphasizes analysis, synthesis and interpretation of major historical issues and documents. Course content includes a study of the principles embodied in the construction of American foreign policy, the federal bureaucracy, economics and grass roots governments are also component parts of the curriculum. Students are helped to develop decision-making skills that are based on values inherent in our democratic society. The course textbook, supplemental reading materials, class assignments, activities and discussions are used to induce reflective thinking. Class instruction in this course is designed to prepare the student for college level study. This course is provided for students possessing excellent reading and communication skills. Students will be required to take the College Board Advanced Placement exam upon completing the course.


    Course Title: Economics

    Prerequisite: None

    This course provides an understanding of the basic principles, concepts, terminology and policies in economics. The primary focus is on the American economic system and its relationship to the goals and values of the American society. Attention is given to a basic understanding of the principles of the free enterprise system and its necessary limited government regulation. An awareness of macroeconomics and economic analysis and reasoning through the examination of such topics as scarcity, production, the market system, the essential characteristics of capitalism, supply and demand, business, labor, money and banking, the measurement of economic activity and government economic policy. Also, the relationship of government and economics will be described in terms of multiple types of economic systems. Economic issues will be stressed.


    Course: International Relations

    Prerequisite: None

    This course examines modern international relations. Foreign policy is analyzed to determine successful relations and problem areas in the world today. Historical and current case studies are used to help students draw conclusions. The focus of the course is not limited to the international relations of the United States.


    Course Title: Philosophy

    Course Prerequisite: None

    Philosophy is often defined as the quest for wisdom or the systematic search for truth. In this introductory course, students will examine historical and contemporary philosophical questions and issues using a thematic approach to this discipline. Major areas of study will include Epistemology, Metaphysics and Axiology. Using this approach, students will examine fundamental questions dealing with the nature of knowledge, the nature of reality and the nature of individual and social values. In addition to the academic understanding of the discipline, students will gain an appreciation for the role that Philosophy can play in improving one’s self-awareness and enhancing one’s intellectual and creative potential.


    Course Title: Psychology

    Prerequisite: None

    Providing a broad, general introduction to psychology, this course will emphasize how the basic subject matter of psychology has been attained by scientific methods. This course will examine patterns and variations of human behavior and the process of human development. It will help the student see how psychological knowledge can be applied to improve the quality of life. Students will take the AP Psychology Exam in May for possible college credit.


    Course Title: Advanced Placement Psychology

    Prerequisite: None

    Advanced Placement Psychology uses the syllabus of the College Board Advanced Placement course. The course provides an overview of research and methods, neuroscience, sensation, perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, developmental psychology, testing and intelligence, personality, abnormal psychology, therapy, and social psychology.


    Course Title: Sociology

    Prerequisite: None

    Students examine society as the interaction of groups, how groups function, and the influence groups have on one another. Through a study of human relations, students are helped to develop a better understanding of those groups to which they belong. Through data collection and use of that data to test hypotheses and to explore sociological alternatives, both oral and written communication skills are developed and strengthened.

Last Modified on August 16, 2008