Social Sciences Department

  •  

    9thWorld History/ Geography: In this course, students learn to think critically about world events and societies around the globe before the year 1500. They learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal.

    Intro to AP World History: Starting with the human communities of early world history, this course teaches students to think critically about large global patterns and themes and to compare human characteristics across time and geographic locations. Students learn about people in different places and environments from 8000 BCE to 1500 CE and gain understanding of the connections and differences between human beings as they study historical trends and events. Since writing is a thinking process, all forms of writing, both formal and informal, are emphasized in this course. Students learn to understand and use primary sources as historical evidence to conduct research and produce essays. This is a course in global history and serves as the foundation course for the 10th grade AP World History class.

  • 10th

    World History/Geography II 1500 - Present: Today, individuals live in a global world that allows them to log on to a computer and talk live to other students in China, India, or South Africa. World History helps students understand how different societies developed the way they did and prepares students to live in a global, interconnected society. In World History II, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped the world. They compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and places. They learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. 

    Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography: AP Human geography helps students analyze the world and their relationship to it. Students learn to look for geographic causes for events in different regions to compare geographic features and their effects on human life, and to see how their lives are connected to and affected by human and geographic conditions all over the globe. In this course, students write, read, discuss, and present issues of global and local importance. Students also learn about an important tool for Human Geography: GIS software. AP Human Geography prepares individuals to be part of the solution to the challenges facing humanity on Earth in the 21st Century. Students have the opportunity to take the AP Human Geography exam in May with the possibility of earning college credit.

    Advanced Placement (AP) World History-Modern 1200- Present: Today, individuals live in a global world that allows them to log on to a computer and talk live to other students in China, India, or South Africa. AP World History helps students understand how different societies developed the way they did and prepares students to live in a global, interconnected society. In AP World History, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. They compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and places. Students learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. They also have a chance to complete an inquiry-based project on a World History topic of personal interest. This course teaches students to think critically and to develop the ability to use evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions. Students have the opportunity to take the AP World History exam in May with the possibility of earning college credit

  • 11thUS & Virginia History: In U.S./Virginia History, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. Students compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and regions. They learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. In this class, students are expected to develop their ability to independently use historical evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions. 

    Advanced Placement US History (APUSH): In AP U.S. History, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. They address questions such as: How did a nation whose Constitution first included the 3/5 Compromise eventually come to have an African-American President in 2009? Students compare the roles of different groups of people, including young people, in different times and regions. Students continue to learn to think in an organized way to understand history and to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. In this class, students are expected to develop their ability to use historical evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions and to improve their ability to think critically about the formation of the United States of America. Students have the opportunity to take the AP U.S. History exam in May with the possibility to earn college credit.

    Dual Enrollment (DE) US History:  In Dual Enrollment U.S. History, students will develop their skills and their knowledge base to function successfully in this college-level class. Requirements for Loudoun County Public Schools and Northern Virginia Community College will have to be met by each student. The course will have university-level academic expectations, but with hard work and the support of our teachers, students will develop to meet the challenge and will earn college credit when they complete it. In this class, students will expand their ability to think analytically about social and historical forces that have shaped their lives. Students will address questions such as: How did a nation whose Constitution first included the 3/5 Compromise eventually come to have an African-American President in 2009? Students will compare the roles of different groups of people in different times and regions. They will come to understand history as an investigation and will develop their abilities to express themselves in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. In Dual Enrollment U.S. History, students are expected to develop their ability to use historical evidence to make arguments and draw conclusions, and to improve their ability to think critically about the growth and development of the United States of America.

    Economics: In this course, students discover that basic economic principles are at work in life every day, and an understanding of these principles helps them to make better economic choices. Students also learn how governments and private financial institutions impact their economic choices by the decisions they make about “who gets what” in a world with scarce resources. Students must take a one-semester course in Economics and a one-semester course in Personal Finance in order to graduate. This course fulfills the Economics portion of the one-year requirement for graduation. 

  •  

    12th

    US & Virginia Government: In U.S./Virginia Government, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about social and political forces that shape their lives. They continue to develop their thinking in an organized way for clear communication in all forms of writing, both formal and informal. They strengthen their independent ability to describe and make conclusions about government structures and policies. This course helps improve students’ ability to think critically and to examine how the people of America meet their needs for constructive political life in a diverse society. Democracy depends on citizens paying attention and getting involved. The course prepares students to be thoughtful and active citizens of the United States. 

    AP US Government Policy & Comparative Government: This course combines AP U.S. and AP Comparative Government. The College Board curricula for both courses have been woven together to make this one coherent, year-long course. Students who seek the 1.0 weight must pass the entire year-long course. Students are encouraged to take both the AP U.S. Government and the AP Comparative Government exams in May. All students are prepared for both exams. In AP Government, students expand their ability to think clearly and carefully about the social and political forces that shape their lives. Concepts which are considered include life under a political system where people are “guilty until proven innocent” and what it would be like to have an election where each office had only one candidate; these are different interpretations of “democracy.” In this class, students study the principles of government in the U.S. and the institutions and laws used to make government work. They also compare U.S. systems and laws used to make government work. They also compare U.S. systems and laws to those of other countries, so students can examine how different societies define “justice” and those societies’ notions of civil rights and civic responsibility. Through the examination and comparison of government systems, students develop and improve their analytical skills, and they improve their ability to think in an organized way about very complex issues that involve many different types of people, groups, and institutions. Students also improve their communication skills since government is a social topic. Students’ analytical writing and active listening skills are significantly developed as they improve their ability to participate in political debate with fairness and respect for diverse perspectives. Students have the opportunity to take the AP U.S. Government and Comparative Government exams in May with the possibility of earning college credit. 

    Economics (If not taken during Junior year): In this course, students discover that basic economic principles are at work in life every day, and an understanding of these principles helps them to make better economic choices. Students also learn how governments and private financial institutions impact their economic choices by the decisions they make about “who gets what” in a world with scarce resources. Students must take a one-semester course in Economics and a one-semester course in Personal Finance in order to graduate. This course fulfills the Economics portion of the one-year requirement for graduation.

  • Electives

    African-American History-Honors                      AP Microeconomics/AP Macroeconomics

    AP Human Geography                                      AP Psychology

    AP Seminar                                                       Semester Psychology

    World of Ideas                                                   Women's Studies

     

     

Last Modified on Thursday at 11:31 AM